Skip to main content
Help

Nintendo WaveBird Wireless Controller Receiver Teardown

Uit elkaar gehaald

Uit elkaar gehaald

Demontages bieden een kijkje in een device en moeten niet worden gebruikt als demontage instructies.

Handleiding met medewerking van leden

Handleiding met medewerking van leden

Een fantastisch lid van onze gemeenschap heeft deze handleiding gemaakt. Deze wordt niet bijgehouden door het team van iFixit.

Stap 1 Nintendo WaveBird Wireless Controller Receiver Teardown  ¶ 

This is the connector side of the WaveBird receiver. Remove two tri-wing screws, and separate the black and gray halves of the receiver.

Stap 1 Nintendo WaveBird Wireless Controller Receiver Teardown  ¶ 

  • This is the connector side of the WaveBird receiver.

  • Remove two tri-wing screws, and separate the black and gray halves of the receiver.

Stap 2  ¶ 

Remove four tri-wing screws to remove the connector from the housing. Remove four tri-wing screws to remove the connector from the housing.

Stap 2  ¶ 

  • Remove four tri-wing screws to remove the connector from the housing.

Stap 3  ¶ 

Insert wisdom here. Insert wisdom here. Insert wisdom here.

Stap 3  ¶ 

  • Insert wisdom here.

Stap 4 Controller pinout  ¶ 

Red: 3.43V logic supply (pin 1 on cable)

Stap 4 Controller pinout  ¶ 

  • Red: 3.43V logic supply (pin 1 on cable)

  • Brown: Ground (pin 3 on cable)

  • Green: Data (pin 2 on cable, recessed by 2mm into connector)

  • Violet: Shield (pin 4 on cable)

Stap 5  ¶ 

The PCB has a metal RF shield that protects the radio from interference from the game console; this extends the useful range of the controller. One half of the shield is held on with friction clips; the other half must be desoldered.

Stap 5  ¶ 

  • The PCB has a metal RF shield that protects the radio from interference from the game console; this extends the useful range of the controller.

  • One half of the shield is held on with friction clips; the other half must be desoldered.

Stap 6  ¶ 

The IC is a custom (or relabeled) Nintendo chip marked "WCRX-DOL / T2.7488K1".  ("Wireless Controller Receiver - Dolphin").  It is presumably a microcontroller that decodes signals from the radio and sends them to the console.

Stap 6  ¶ 

  • The IC is a custom (or relabeled) Nintendo chip marked "WCRX-DOL / T2.7488K1". ("Wireless Controller Receiver - Dolphin"). It is presumably a microcontroller that decodes signals from the radio and sends them to the console.

  • This 4-pin connector goes to the joypad connector on the GameCube.

  • Desolder these four points to remove the shield and expose the radio on the other side.

Stap 7  ¶ 

The bottom side has all the RF circuitry -- the chip is a Nintendo chip marked "WR-DOL / H2102 / CG2710 / 02", presumably the radio.

Stap 7  ¶ 

  • The bottom side has all the RF circuitry -- the chip is a Nintendo chip marked "WR-DOL / H2102 / CG2710 / 02", presumably the radio.

  • EPCOS X6882 custom bandpass filter

  • Trim-pot for adjustment at the factory -- could be a frequency tweak or gain adjustment.

  • The rotary switch allows the user to choose a frequency to avoid interference with other devices.

  • The antenna is mounted directly on the PCB, inside the device.