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Current version by: Dan ,

Text:

I support Mayers' position (granted a little late in the dialog)
 
You should use a grounding strap and mat that is bonded to a good ground point. At times I do cheat. But, I do so by having the unit I'm working on plugged in (ground cord devices only) and turned off. Then I keep one hand holding the metal chassis so I'm at the same voltage potential as the device and my tools I am usingusing, never moving or touching anything else.
You should use a grounding strap and mat that is bonded to a good ground point. At times I do cheat. But, I do so by having the unit I'm working on plugged in (ground cord devices only) and turned off. Then I keep one hand holding the metal chassis so I'm at the same voltage potential as the device and my tools I am usingusing, never moving or touching anything else.
 
The issue is your climate plays a big part on how much static electricity is present (ESD). A humid environment wont face the same risks than a very dry environment does. So in the middle of the winter in Alaska it's a must, in the rain forest of central America not so much a need.
 
OK - What proof is there is any harm not using one? The damage is not always instant, often it can take a few days or a year or two to show up. Which make it hard for many to believe it was a factor.
 
When I was working at IBM they gave us a very compelling demo. Using a electron microscope they show us a circuit which had test leads exiting which we applied an ESD charge. With our own eyes we could see the area vaporize and become damaged. We did this three times with different voltages two showed damage but still worked. It was clear the damage weakened the chip as it did finally fail.

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open

Original post by: Dan ,

Text:

I support Mayers' position (granted a little late in the dialog)

You should use a grounding strap and mat that is bonded to a good ground point. At times I do cheat. But, I do so by having the unit I'm working on plugged in (ground cord devices only) and turned off. Then I keep one hand holding the metal chassis so I'm at the same voltage potential as the device and my tools I am using never moving or touching anything else.

The issue is your climate plays a big part on how much static electricity is present (ESD). A humid environment wont face the same risks than a very dry environment does. So in the middle of the winter in Alaska it's a must, in the rain forest of central America not so much a need.

OK - What proof is there is any harm not using one? The damage is not always instant, often it can take a few days or a year or two to show up. Which make it hard for many to believe it was a factor.

When I was working at IBM they gave us a very compelling demo. Using a electron microscope they show us a circuit which had test leads exiting which we applied an ESD charge. With our own eyes we could see the area vaporize and become damaged. We did this three times with different voltages two showed damage but still worked. It was clear the damage weakened the chip as it did finally fail.

Status:

open