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Deze versie is geschreven door: jamesqb2001 ,

Titel:

Any software that gives details during restore failure?

Tekst:

Hi,

Is there any software available for the PC, free or paid, which will try to restore an iPhone, while giving step by step details on the restore process so if it fails, you can see what it was trying to do when it failed and therefore have a good idea of the problem area?

For instance, your iPhone might be stuck in recovery mode. You try a restore in iTunes. It fails with error 9. You search the internet and find various different potential causes, including CPU solder ball issues, NAND solder ball issues or data corruption, front camera causing it, Tristar causing it, a USB cable that isn’t good enough, you were using a USB hub, etc.

You then find a forum post stating that any faulty data or clock line on the I2C bus could cause it too, from a short-circuit line to a cracked solder ball, which now implicates a large number of ICs and parts.

Isn’t there anything available to make this process simpler, by showing what IC the software was trying to communicate with which failed?

Thanks

Apparaat:

iPhone 6

Status:

open

Goedgekeurd antwoord:

572980

Origineel bericht door: jamesqb2001 ,

Titel:

Any software that gives details during restore failure?

Tekst:

Hi,

Is there any software available for the PC, free or paid, which will try to restore an iPhone, while giving step by step details on the restore process so if it fails, you can see what it was trying to do when it failed and therefore have a good idea of the problem area?

For instance, your iPhone might be stuck in recovery mode. You try a restore in iTunes. It fails with error 9. You search the internet and find various different potential causes, including CPU solder ball issues, NAND solder ball issues or data corruption, front camera causing it, Tristar causing it, a USB cable that isn’t good enough, you were using a USB hub, etc.

You then find a forum post stating that any faulty data or clock line on the I2C bus could cause it too, from a short-circuit line to a cracked solder ball, which now implicates a large number of ICs and parts.

Isn’t there anything available to make this process simpler, by showing what IC the software was trying to communicate with which failed?

Thanks

Apparaat:

iPhone 6

Status:

open