Skip to main content
Help

Current version by: pauldoyle98 ,

Text:

I faced this very issue last month when upgrading the CPU in my Compaq notebook.notebook (AMD P320 2.1 GHz dual core to AMD N620 2.8 GHz dual core). After the upgrade, I powered on the notebook, and within a couple of minutes it just shut itself right off. II did this a couple more times. ThinkingThinking it was a dead CPU, I tore down the laptop again, and discovered that there was about a 1mm air gap between the GPU and the heatsink. When

When
I did the upgrade, I removed the old GPU thermalthermal pad that was stuck to the heatsink, and justrather cavalierly applied Arctic Silver 5. Well5, thinking that would do it.

Well, after this epic fail
, I could see that thisthe AS5 wasn't enough to bridge the ~1mm gap between the top of the GPU and the copper heat sink surface, so I improvised.improvised: I made a nice, heat-conducting shim. Using

Using
a sharp knife, I cut a nice, smooth, flat 3/163/8" x 7/87/16" rectangular piece of aluminum off a thick foil casserole baking pan (about 1mm thick) that I had lying around. I cleaned both sides of the the shim with 91% isopropyl alcohol, applied thin, even films of Arctic Silver 5 to it and the heat sink ("staining" it), and to the top surfaces of the GPU & CPU,CPU. I reassembled my notebook, powered it on, and I'm good to go. Temps

Temps
on the GPU & CPU get no higher than 74°C67°C at 2.8 GHz,GHz fully loaded, gaming, etc., which is going to be typical for this class CPU, and in a laptop. 28% speed improvement, all around. Totally worth the effort. But anyway, yeah...maybe try this aluminum shim approach. Or maybe even copper, if you can find it. IEven though copper is about 3 times better than aluminum at conducting heat, I don't think the results willoperating temperatures would be THAT much betterdrastically lower with copper.it.

bump
I faced this very issue last month when upgrading the CPU in my Compaq notebook.notebook (AMD P320 2.1 GHz dual core to AMD N620 2.8 GHz dual core). After the upgrade, I powered on the notebook, and within a couple of minutes it just shut itself right off. II did this a couple more times. ThinkingThinking it was a dead CPU, I tore down the laptop again, and discovered that there was about a 1mm air gap between the GPU and the heatsink. When

When
I did the upgrade, I removed the old GPU thermalthermal pad that was stuck to the heatsink, and justrather cavalierly applied Arctic Silver 5. Well5, thinking that would do it.

Well, after this epic fail
, I could see that thisthe AS5 wasn't enough to bridge the ~1mm gap between the top of the GPU and the copper heat sink surface, so I improvised.improvised: I made a nice, heat-conducting shim. Using

Using
a sharp knife, I cut a nice, smooth, flat 3/163/8" x 7/87/16" rectangular piece of aluminum off a thick foil casserole baking pan (about 1mm thick) that I had lying around. I cleaned both sides of the the shim with 91% isopropyl alcohol, applied thin, even films of Arctic Silver 5 to it and the heat sink ("staining" it), and to the top surfaces of the GPU & CPU,CPU. I reassembled my notebook, powered it on, and I'm good to go. Temps

Temps
on the GPU & CPU get no higher than 74°C67°C at 2.8 GHz,GHz fully loaded, gaming, etc., which is going to be typical for this class CPU, and in a laptop. 28% speed improvement, all around. Totally worth the effort. But anyway, yeah...maybe try this aluminum shim approach. Or maybe even copper, if you can find it. IEven though copper is about 3 times better than aluminum at conducting heat, I don't think the results willoperating temperatures would be THAT much betterdrastically lower with copper.it.

bump

Status:

open

Original post by: pauldoyle98 ,

Text:

I faced this very issue when upgrading the CPU in my Compaq notebook. (AMD P320 2.1 GHz dual core to AMD N620 2.8 GHz dual core). After the upgrade, I powered on the notebook, and within a couple of minutes it just shut right off.  I did this a couple more times.  Thinking it was a dead CPU, I tore down the laptop again, and discovered that there was about a 1mm air gap between the GPU and the heatsink.  When I did the upgrade, I removed the old GPU  thermal pad that was stuck to the heatsink, and just applied Arctic Silver 5.  Well, I could see that this wasn't enough to bridge the ~1mm gap between the top of the GPU and the copper heat sink surface, so I improvised. I made a nice, heat-conducting shim. Using a sharp knife, I cut a nice, smooth, flat 3/16" x 7/8" rectangular piece of aluminum off a thick foil casserole baking pan (about 1mm thick) that I had lying around. I cleaned both sides of the the shim with 91% isopropyl alcohol, applied thin, even films of Arctic Silver 5 to it and the heat sink ("staining" it), to the top surfaces of the GPU & CPU, reassembled my notebook, and I'm good to go. Temps on the GPU & CPU get no higher than 74°C at 2.8 GHz, fully loaded, gaming, etc., which is going to be typical for this class CPU, and in a laptop. 28% speed improvement, all around. Totally worth the effort.  But anyway, yeah...maybe try this aluminum shim approach.  Or maybe even copper, if you can find it.  I don't think the results will be THAT much better with copper.

Status:

open