Skip to main content
Help

Deze versie is geschreven door: rdklinc ,

Tekst:

Wow, this is an interesting case! DC-ins are very strange creatures...I've run across many in iBooks that appear dead or problematic, but once they are disconnected for a while, then re-connected, they work like new. It's as if they hold onto a "bad charge" which affects their behavior until it is allowed to dissipate. The question in this case seems to be, what is causing that "bad charge"?
 
Here's what I'd do: First, make sure you have a 65-watt AC adapter, since 15" aluminums don't like 45-watt ACs. That could be the problem right there -- 45W adapters often work tofor a certain degreewhile, but then the situation gets flaky whenweird stuff starts happening as they (I assume) are ultimately unable to meet the power requirements get too highrequirement. Next, since you mentioned having your DC-in temporarily disconnected made it work temporarily, I'd go in and disconnect it for an hour or overnight, then re-connect it. Next, I would remove your battery, and connect your laptop to AC power, but do it on the other side of the house (on a different circuit). If it works in that condition for a sustained period, you can try either the battery, or plugging into the original power source, to see if it goes bad again. Doing this, step-by-step, hopefully you'll be able to isolate the issue.
Here's what I'd do: First, make sure you have a 65-watt AC adapter, since 15" aluminums don't like 45-watt ACs. That could be the problem right there -- 45W adapters often work tofor a certain degreewhile, but then the situation gets flaky whenweird stuff starts happening as they (I assume) are ultimately unable to meet the power requirements get too highrequirement. Next, since you mentioned having your DC-in temporarily disconnected made it work temporarily, I'd go in and disconnect it for an hour or overnight, then re-connect it. Next, I would remove your battery, and connect your laptop to AC power, but do it on the other side of the house (on a different circuit). If it works in that condition for a sustained period, you can try either the battery, or plugging into the original power source, to see if it goes bad again. Doing this, step-by-step, hopefully you'll be able to isolate the issue.
 
If none of this helps, you may be looking at a bad board.

Status:

open

Bewerkt door: rdklinc ,

Tekst:

Wow, this is an interesting case! DC-ins are very strange creatures...I've run across many in iBooks that appear dead or problematic, but once they are disconnected for a while, then re-connected, they work like new. It's as if they hold onto a "bad charge" which affects their behavior until it is allowed to dissipate. The question in this case seems to be, what is causing that "bad charge"?
 
Here's what I'd do: First, make sure you have a 65-watt AC adapter, since 15" aluminums don't like 45-watt ACs. That could be the problem right therethere -- 45W adapters often work to a certain degree, but then the situation gets flaky when the power requirements get too high. Next, since you mentioned having your DC-in temporarily disconnected made it work temporarily, I'd go in and disconnect it for an hour or overnight, then re-connect it. Next, I would remove your battery, and connect your laptop to AC power, but do it on the other side of the house (on a different circuit). If it works in that condition for a sustained period, you can try either the battery, or plugging into the original power source, to see if it goes bad again. Doing this, step-by-step, hopefully you'll be able to isolate the issue.
Here's what I'd do: First, make sure you have a 65-watt AC adapter, since 15" aluminums don't like 45-watt ACs. That could be the problem right therethere -- 45W adapters often work to a certain degree, but then the situation gets flaky when the power requirements get too high. Next, since you mentioned having your DC-in temporarily disconnected made it work temporarily, I'd go in and disconnect it for an hour or overnight, then re-connect it. Next, I would remove your battery, and connect your laptop to AC power, but do it on the other side of the house (on a different circuit). If it works in that condition for a sustained period, you can try either the battery, or plugging into the original power source, to see if it goes bad again. Doing this, step-by-step, hopefully you'll be able to isolate the issue.
 
If none of this helps, you may be looking at a bad board.

Status:

open

Bewerkt door: rdklinc ,

Tekst:

Wow, this is an interesting case! DC-ins are very strange creatures...I've run across many in iBooks that appear dead or problematic, and but once they are disconnected for a while, then re-connected, they work like new. It's as if they hold onto a "bad charge" which affects their behavior until it is allowed to dissipate. The question in this case seems to be, what is causing that "bad charge"?
Wow, this is an interesting case! DC-ins are very strange creatures...I've run across many in iBooks that appear dead or problematic, and but once they are disconnected for a while, then re-connected, they work like new. It's as if they hold onto a "bad charge" which affects their behavior until it is allowed to dissipate. The question in this case seems to be, what is causing that "bad charge"?
 
Here's what I'd do: First, make sure you have a 65-watt AC adapter, since 15" aluminums don't like 45-watt ACs. That could be the problem right there. Next, since you mentioned having your DC-in temporarily disconnected made it work temporarily, I'd go in and disconnect it for an hour or overnight, then re-connect it. Next, I would remove your battery, and connect your laptop to AC power, but do it on the other side of the house (on a different circuit). If it works in that condition for a sustained period, you can try either the battery, or plugging into the original power source, to see if it goes bad again. Doing this, step-by-step, hopefully you'll be able to isolate the issue.
 
If none of this helps, you may be looking at a bad board.

Status:

open

Origineel bericht door: rdklinc ,

Tekst:

Wow, this is an interesting case!  DC-ins are very strange creatures...I've run across many in iBooks that appear dead or problematic, and but once they are disconnected for a while, then re-connected, they work like new.  It's as if they hold onto a "bad charge" which affects their behavior until it is allowed to dissipate.  The question in this case seems to be, what is causing that "bad charge"?

Here's what I'd do:  First, make sure you have a 65-watt AC adapter, since 15" aluminums don't like 45-watt ACs.  That could be the problem right there.  Next, since you mentioned having your DC-in temporarily disconnected made it work temporarily, I'd go in and disconnect it for an hour or overnight, then re-connect it.  Next, I would remove your battery, and connect your laptop to AC power, but do it on the other side of the house (on a different circuit).  If it works in that condition for a sustained period, you can try either the battery, or plugging into the original power source, to see if it goes bad again.  Doing this, step-by-step, hopefully you'll be able to isolate the issue.

If none of this helps, you may be looking at a bad board.

Status:

open