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What you are asking is both a very hard question to answer and an extremely easy one to answer, have I confused you even more yet? The hard part is there is no exact formula or way to directly answer your question(s). So let us break this down to the different ,elements of your question(s). A bit is a charter, such as a 1 or a 0. One is on zero is off. But no matter whether it is a 1 or a 0 it occupies space. A byte is 8 charters or spaces, a Meg is a million charters and a Gig is a billion charters and so on and so forth. These bits are machine language also known as binary code that speak to the chips and occupy the space on your hard drive. Please see [http://www.ifixit.com/Answers/View/49694/What+exactly+is+binary+code#answer49703|here for a very simplified definition of binary code.] I don't believe any one person or definition could explain to your satisfaction/understanding the differences between bits, bytes and gigs in a meaningful manner I highly suggest you do a Google on that and read until the light bulb lights up. It is not that there isn't a clear definition of the terms. Rather these concepts need to be understood on your terms.
 
Next there is what is known as file compression. Commonly the hardest files to compress are viseosvideos and photos. The firmware on your hard drive tries to store the information in a manner that uses the least amount of space. Think of it as secret code if you want. It takes common words or phrases and represents them with a character, such as the phrase "and then" might be represented by the letter a - in binary code. The hard drive stores a dictionary that defines the terms and is the code key. Some files have less repetitive phrases in them and can't be compressed by the secret code.
Next there is what is known as file compression. Commonly the hardest files to compress are viseosvideos and photos. The firmware on your hard drive tries to store the information in a manner that uses the least amount of space. Think of it as secret code if you want. It takes common words or phrases and represents them with a character, such as the phrase "and then" might be represented by the letter a - in binary code. The hard drive stores a dictionary that defines the terms and is the code key. Some files have less repetitive phrases in them and can't be compressed by the secret code.
 
Archiving or backing up your files/information is something you do yourself. The same goes for restoring. You are correct in thinking that if you restore it can write over information on your disk. I believe Apple is telling you to do a factory restore which will solve operating system problems, but will wipe out your data and installed programs. You will need to back up your personal files and reinstall the software.
 
I hope I haven't confused you further. Such is not my intent. If you have any more questions or concerns please feel free to express them and someone will try to address them.

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Bewerkt door: ABCellars ,

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What you are asking is both a very hard question to answer and an extremely easy one to answer, have I confused you even more yet? The hard part is there is no exact formula or way to directly answer your question(s). So let us break this down to the different ,elements of your question(s). A bit is a charter, such as a 1 or a 0. One is on zero is off. But no matter whether it is a 1 or a 0 it occupies space. A byte is 8 charters or spaces, a Meg is a million charters and a Gig is a billion charters and so on and so forth. These bits are machine language also known as binary code that speak to the chips and occupy the space on your hard drive. Please see [http://www.ifixit.com/Answers/View/49694/What+exactly+is+binary+code#answer49703|here for a very simplified definition of binary code.] I don't believe any one person or definition could explain to your satisfaction/understanding the differences between bits, bytes and gigs in a meaningful manner I highly suggest you do a Google on that and read until the light bulb lights up. It is not that there isn't a clear definition of the terms. Rather these concepts need to be understood on your terms.
 
Next there is what is known as file compression. Commonly the hardest files to compress are picturesviseos and photos. The firmware on your hard drive tries to store the information in a manner that uses the least amount of space. Think of it as secret code if you want. It takes common words or phrases and represents them with a character, such as the phrase "and then" might be represented by the letter a - in binary code. The hard drive stores a dictionary that defines the terms and is the code key. Some files have less repetitive phrases in them and can't be compressed by the secret code.
Next there is what is known as file compression. Commonly the hardest files to compress are picturesviseos and photos. The firmware on your hard drive tries to store the information in a manner that uses the least amount of space. Think of it as secret code if you want. It takes common words or phrases and represents them with a character, such as the phrase "and then" might be represented by the letter a - in binary code. The hard drive stores a dictionary that defines the terms and is the code key. Some files have less repetitive phrases in them and can't be compressed by the secret code.
 
Archiving or backing up your files/information is something you do yourself. The same goes for restoring. You are correct in thinking that if you restore it can write over information on your disk. I believe Apple is telling you to do a factory restore which will solve operating system problems, but will wipe out your data and installed programs. You will need to back up your personal files and reinstall the software.
 
I hope I haven't confused you further. Such is not my intent. If you have any more questions or concerns please feel free to express them and someone will try to address them.

Status:

open

Origineel bericht door: ABCellars ,

Tekst:

What you are asking is both a very hard question to answer and an extremely easy one to answer, have I confused you even more yet? The hard part is there is no exact formula or way to directly answer your question(s). So let us break this down to the different ,elements of your question(s). A bit is a charter, such as a 1 or a 0. One is on zero is off. But no matter whether it is a 1 or a 0 it occupies space. A byte is 8 charters or spaces, a Meg is a million charters and a Gig is a billion charters and so on and so forth. These bits are machine language also known as binary code that speak to the chips and occupy the space on your hard drive. Please see [http://www.ifixit.com/Answers/View/49694/What+exactly+is+binary+code#answer49703|here for a very simplified definition of binary code.]  I don't believe any one person or definition could explain to your satisfaction/understanding the differences between bits, bytes and gigs in a meaningful manner I highly suggest you do a Google on that and read until the light bulb lights up. It is not that there isn't a clear definition of the terms. Rather these concepts need to be understood on your terms.

Next there is what is known as file compression. Commonly the hardest files to compress are pictures and photos. The firmware on your hard drive tries to store the information in a manner that uses the least amount of space. Think of it as secret code if you want. It takes common words or phrases and represents them with a character, such as the phrase "and then" might be represented by the letter a - in binary code. The hard drive stores a dictionary that defines the terms and is the code key. Some files have less repetitive phrases in them and can't be compressed by the secret code.

Archiving or backing up your files/information is something you do yourself. The same goes for restoring. You are correct in thinking that if you  restore it can write over information on your disk. I believe Apple is telling you to do a factory restore which will solve operating system problems, but will wipe out your data and installed programs. You will need to back up your personal files and reinstall the software.

I hope I haven't confused you further. Such is not my intent. If you have any more questions or concerns please feel free to express them and someone will try to address them.

Status:

open