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Deze versie is geschreven door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi,
 
Here is an image showing the location of the two temperature sending units (or sensors) for your vehicle.
 
''The one on the left,'' where the single wire black connector has been disconnected is the ''sending unit'' for the dashboard ''gauge''.
 
The one on the right with the grey connector (and being held by fingers) is the ECU temperature sensor.
 
[image|899348]
 
(click on image to enlarge for better viewing)
 
To test the sending unit, disconnect the single wire black connector and using a DMM (Digital Multimeter - Ohmmeter function) measure the resistance between the sending unit terminal and earth (or ground - the engine block will be earthed). With a cold engine the resistance should be approx 140 Ohms. With a hot engine it should measure 30-50 Ohms.
 
If it reads approx. 140 Ohm (or more) when the engine is both cold and hot then the sensor is faulty and needs to be replaced.
 
If the sensor reads 30-50 Ohms when the engine is hot then there may be a problem with the wiring back to the gauge or with the gauge itself.
 
'' '''Be safety aware''' ''
''Make
''Make
sure the engine is turned OFF and that the vehicle's ignition key is in your pocket when you test the sensorsensor. Also don't burn yourself on the engine block when the engine is hot''
''Make
''Make
sure the engine is turned OFF and that the vehicle's ignition key is in your pocket when you test the sensorsensor. Also don't burn yourself on the engine block when the engine is hot''

Status:

open

Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi,
 
Here is an image showing the location of the two temperature sending units (or sensors) for your vehicle.
 
''The one on the left,'' where the single wire black connector has been disconnected is the ''sending unit'' for the dashboard ''gauge''.
 
The one on the right with the grey connector (and being held by fingers) is the ECU temperature sensor.
 
[image|899348]
 
(click on image to enlarge for better viewing)
 
To test the sending unit, disconnect the single wire black connector and using a DMM (Digital Multimeter - Ohmmeter function) measure the resistance between the sending unit terminal and earth (or ground - the engine block will be earthed). With a cold engine the resistance should be approx 140 Ohms. With a hot engine it should measure 30-50 Ohms.
 
If it reads approx. 140 Ohm (or more) when the engine is both cold and hot then the sensor is faulty and needs to be replaced.
 
If the sensor reads 30-50 Ohms when the engine is hot then there may be a problem with the wiring back to the gauge or with the gauge itself.
 
'' '''Be safety aware''' ''

''Make
''Make sure the engine is turned OFF and that the vehicle's ignition key is in your pocket when you test the sensor''

''Make
''Make sure the engine is turned OFF and that the vehicle's ignition key is in your pocket when you test the sensor''

Status:

open

Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi,
Here is an image showing the location of the two temperature sending unit (or sensors) for your vehicle.
''The one on the left,'' where the single wire black connector has been disconnected is the ''sensor sending unit'' to the dashboard ''gauge''.
The one on the right with the grey connector (and being held by fingers) is the ECU sensor.
 
Here is an image showing the location of the two temperature sending units (or sensors) for your vehicle.
 
''The one on the left,'' where the single wire black connector has been disconnected is the ''sending unit'' for the dashboard ''gauge''.
 
The one on the right with the grey connector (and being held by fingers) is the ECU temperature sensor.
 
[image|899348]
(click on image to enlarge for better viewing)
 
(click on image to enlarge for better viewing)
 
To test the sending unit, disconnect the single wire black connector and using a DMM (Digital Multimeter - Ohmmeter function) measure the resistance between the sending unit terminal and earth (or ground - the engine block will be earthed). With a cold engine the resistance should be approx 140 Ohms. With a hot engine it should measure 30-50 Ohms.
 
If it reads approx. 140 Ohm (or more) when the engine is both cold and hot then the sensor is faulty and needs to be replaced.
 
If the sensor reads 30-50 Ohms when the engine is hot then there may be a problem with the wiring back to the gauge or with the gauge itself.
 
'' '''Be safety aware''' ''
 
''Make sure the engine is turned OFF and that the ignition key is in your pocket when you test the sensor''

Status:

open

Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi,
Here is an image showing the location of the two temperature sending unit (or sensors) for your vehicle.
''The one on the left,'' where the single wire black connector has been disconnected is the ''sensor sending unit'' to the dashboard ''gauge''.
The one on the right with the grey connector (and being held by fingers) is the ECU sensor.
 
Here is a link to an ifixit answer that may be of some help.
 
[post|338561]image|899348]
(click on image to enlarge for better viewing)
[post|338561]image|899348]
(click on image to enlarge for better viewing)
 
It shows the location of the temperature sending unit (or sensor) for the dashboard temperature gauge.
 
To test the sending unit, disconnect the single wire black connector and using a DMM (Digital Multimeter - Ohmmeter function) measure the resistance between the sending unit terminal and earth (or ground - the engine block will be earthed). With a cold engine the resistance should be approx 140 Ohms. With a hot engine it should measure 30-50 Ohms.
 
If it reads approx. 140 Ohm (or more) when the engine is both cold and hot then the sensor is faulty and needs to be replaced.
 
If the sensor reads 30-50 Ohms when the engine is hot then there may be a problem with the wiring back to the gauge or with the gauge itself.
 
'' '''Be safety aware''' ''
 
''Make sure the engine is turned OFF and that the ignition key is in your pocket when you test the sensor''

Status:

open

Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi,
 
Here is a link to an ifixit answer that may be of some help.
 
[post|338561]
 
It shows the location of the temperature sending unit (or sensor) for the dashboard temperature gauge.
 
To test the sending unit, disconnect the single wire black connector and using a DMM (Digital Multimeter - Ohmmeter function) measure the resistance between the sending unit terminal and earth (or ground - the engine block will be earthed). With a cold engine the resistance should be approx 140 Ohms. With a hot engine it should measure 30-50 Ohms.
 
If it reads approx. 140 Ohm (or more) when the engine is both cold and hot then the sensor is faulty and needs to be replaced.
If it reads approx. 140 Ohm (or more) when the engine is both cold and hot then the sensor is faulty and needs to be replaced.
 
If the sensor reads 30-50 Ohms when the engine is hot then there may be a problem with the wiring back to the gauge or with the gauge itself.
 
'' '''Be safety aware''' ''
 
''Make sure the engine is turned OFF and that the ignition key is in your pocket when you test the sensor''

Status:

open

Origineel bericht door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi,

Here is a link to an ifixit answer that may be of some help.

[post|338561]

It shows the location of the temperature sending unit (or sensor) for the dashboard temperature gauge.

To test the sending unit, disconnect the single wire black connector and using a DMM (Digital Multimeter - Ohmmeter function) measure the resistance between the sending unit terminal and earth (or ground - the engine block will be earthed). With a cold engine the resistance should be approx 140 Ohms. With a hot engine it should measure 30-50 Ohms.

If it reads approx. 140 Ohm when the engine is both cold and hot then the sensor is faulty and needs to be replaced.

If the sensor reads 30-50 Ohms when the engine is hot then there may be a problem with the wiring back to the gauge or with the gauge itself.

'' '''Be safety aware''' ''

''Make sure the engine is turned OFF and that the ignition key is in your pocket when you test the sensor''

Status:

open