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Deze versie is geschreven door: jayeff ,

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Hi @luke ,
 
Here is a link to the [https://fanbase.hunterfan.com/SupportDocuments/OwnersManuals/M3571-01.pdf|User/Installation manual] (found from [https://www.hunterfan.com/ceiling-fans/contempo-with-light-54-inch-fam125|this] webpage).
 
The wiring (p.11) seems to indicate that the remote controls the amount of current to the fan motor and the lights. A resistor burning out indicates excess current, usually caused by a short circuit (s/c) or a s/c to Earth.
 
With the fan '''disconnected from everything''', use an Ohmmeter to check the resistance between the white wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''. (this is the fan motor - I think)
 
the blue wire (or black/white stripe) ''from the fan''. (this is the lights - I think)
 
The motor may read a low resistance as might the lights but not a s/c.
 
and also between the green/yellow stripe wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''
 
the blue wire (or black /white stripe)''from the fan''
 
This will test if there is a connection between either of the two circuits, (motor and light) and earth (which there shouldn't be).
 
If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting Hunter fans at social@help.hunterfan.com. and ask if this is the case. It never hurts to ask.
 
As an aside, if you haven't already, it might be advisable to have one (or more) of these [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residual-current_device|RCD (Residual Current Device - Safety Switch)] installed in the power outlet and light circuits of the premises, as a safeguard against any future electrical problems. If it was a leakage to earth problem, the RCD would've tripped, isolating the circuit.
 
=== Update (05/03/2018) ===
 
Hi @luke ,
 
The readings for the motor seem rather high. I was expecting somewhere in the range of 30-200 Ohms for the motor winding. It may be that the run winding has burnt out and that you're reading leakage resistance through the capacitor / start winding. On starting most of the current goes through a lower resistance start winding, and if the start winding cut out switch was s/c for instance the start winding would still be "in circuit' and therefore drawing excess current burning out the resistor. This is only speculation on my part.
 
To find out how it is wired you'd have to dig deeper into the fan. Personally I'd go the warranty route first , if still applicable.
 
I don't know how your particular fan motor is wired but I imagined that it would be something similar to the image below. Speed being controlled by the receiver box regulating the current supply to the fan
 
[image|1444747]
 
,
 
What is not shown in this image is that usually there is a centrifugal switch in the motor that o/c the start winding circuit (Aux winding in this particular image) when the motor gets up to speed.
 
With the light circuit, I may have mis''LED'' (pun intended) you. I overlooked that the fan has LED lights which may account for the high reading. Did youYou can't really test LEDs with an Ohmmeter accurately. You could try reversing the meterdiode test leads when you testedin the 'light' circuit, just to checkDMM if there is one (reverse the leads to see if it makes a difference) but again it depends how it is set up. The only good thing about what you tested is that there wasn't a very low resistance reading was different?which could cause excess current to flow.
With the light circuit, I may have mis''LED'' (pun intended) you. I overlooked that the fan has LED lights which may account for the high reading. Did youYou can't really test LEDs with an Ohmmeter accurately. You could try reversing the meterdiode test leads when you testedin the 'light' circuit, just to checkDMM if there is one (reverse the leads to see if it makes a difference) but again it depends how it is set up. The only good thing about what you tested is that there wasn't a very low resistance reading was different?which could cause excess current to flow.

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Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

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Hi @luke ,
 
Here is a link to the [https://fanbase.hunterfan.com/SupportDocuments/OwnersManuals/M3571-01.pdf|User/Installation manual] (found from [https://www.hunterfan.com/ceiling-fans/contempo-with-light-54-inch-fam125|this] webpage).
 
The wiring (p.11) seems to indicate that the remote controls the amount of current to the fan motor and the lights. A resistor burning out indicates excess current, usually caused by a short circuit (s/c) or a s/c to Earth.
 
With the fan '''disconnected from everything''', use an Ohmmeter to check the resistance between the white wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''. (this is the fan motor - I think)
 
the blue wire (or black/white stripe) ''from the fan''. (this is the lights - I think)
 
The motor may read a low resistance as might the lights but not a s/c.
 
and also between the green/yellow stripe wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''
 
the blue wire (or black /white stripe)''from the fan''
 
This will test if there is a connection between either of the two circuits, (motor and light) and earth (which there shouldn't be).
 
If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting Hunter fans at social@help.hunterfan.com. and ask if this is the case. It never hurts to ask.
 
As an aside, if you haven't already, it might be advisable to have one (or more) of these [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residual-current_device|RCD (Residual Current Device - Safety Switch)] installed in the power outlet and light circuits of the premises, as a safeguard against any future electrical problems. If it was a leakage to earth problem, the RCD would've tripped, isolating the circuit.
 
=== Update (05/03/2018) ===
 
Hi @luke ,
 
The readings for the motor seem rather high. I was expecting somewhere in the range of 30-200 Ohms for the motor winding. It may be that the run winding has burnt out and that you're reading leakage resistance through the capacitor / start winding. On starting most of the current goes through a lower resistance start winding, and if the start winding cut out switch was s/c for instance the start winding would still be "in circuit' and therefore drawing excess current burning out the resistor. This is only speculation on my part.
 
To find out how it is wired you'd have to dig deeper into the fan. Personally I'd go the warranty route first , if still applicable.
 
I don't know how your particular fan motor is wired but I imagined that it would be something similar to the image below. Speed being controlled by the receiver box regulating the current supply to the fan
 
[image|1444747]
 
,
 
What is not shown in this image is that usually there is a centrifugal switch in the motor that o/c the start winding circuit (Aux winding in this particular image) when the motor gets up to speed.
What is not shown in this image is that usually there is a centrifugal switch in the motor that o/c the start winding circuit (Aux winding in this particular image) when the motor gets up to speed.
 
With the light circuit, I may have mis''LED'' (pun intended) you. I overlooked that the fan has LED lights which may account for the high reading. Did you try reversing the meter test leads when you tested the 'light' circuit, just to check if the reading was different?

Status:

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Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi @luke ,
 
Here is a link to the [https://fanbase.hunterfan.com/SupportDocuments/OwnersManuals/M3571-01.pdf|User/Installation manual] (found from [https://www.hunterfan.com/ceiling-fans/contempo-with-light-54-inch-fam125|this] webpage).
 
The wiring (p.11) seems to indicate that the remote controls the amount of current to the fan motor and the lights. A resistor burning out indicates excess current, usually caused by a short circuit (s/c) or a s/c to Earth.
 
With the fan '''disconnected from everything''', use an Ohmmeter to check the resistance between the white wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''. (this is the fan motor - I think)
 
the blue wire (or black/white stripe) ''from the fan''. (this is the lights - I think)
 
The motor may read a low resistance as might the lights but not a s/c.
 
and also between the green/yellow stripe wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''
 
the blue wire (or black /white stripe)''from the fan''
 
This will test if there is a connection between either of the two circuits, (motor and light) and earth (which there shouldn't be).
 
If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting Hunter fans at social@help.hunterfan.com. and ask if this is the case. It never hurts to ask.
 
As an aside, if you haven't already, it might be advisable to have one (or more) of these [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residual-current_device|RCD (Residual Current Device - Safety Switch)] installed in the power outlet and light circuits of the premises, as a safeguard against any future electrical problems. If it was a leakage to earth problem, the RCD would've tripped, isolating the circuit.
 
=== Update (05/03/2018) ===
 
Hi @luke ,
 
The readings for the motor seem rather high. I was expecting somewhere in the range of 30-200 Ohms for the motor winding. It may be that the run winding has burnt out and that you're reading leakage resistance through the capacitor / start winding. On starting most of the current goes through a lower resistance start winding, and if the start winding cut out switch was s/c for instance the start winding would still be "in circuit' and therefore drawing excess current burning out the resistor. This is only speculation on my part.
 
To find out how it is wired you'd have to dig deeper into the fan. Personally I'd go the warranty route first , if still applicable.
 
I don't know how your particular fan motor is wired but I imagined that it would be something similar to the image below. Speed being controlled by the receiver box.box regulating the current supply to the fan
I don't know how your particular fan motor is wired but I imagined that it would be something similar to the image below. Speed being controlled by the receiver box.box regulating the current supply to the fan
 
[image|1444747]
 
,
 
What is not shown in this image is that usually there is a centrifugal switch in the motor that o/c the start winding circuit when the motor gets up to speed.
 
With the light circuit, I may have mis''LED'' (pun intended) you. I overlooked that the fan has LED lights which may account for the high reading. Did you try reversing the meter test leads when you tested the 'light' circuit, just to check if the reading was different?

Status:

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Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi @luke ,
 
Here is a link to the [https://fanbase.hunterfan.com/SupportDocuments/OwnersManuals/M3571-01.pdf|User/Installation manual] (found from [https://www.hunterfan.com/ceiling-fans/contempo-with-light-54-inch-fam125|this] webpage).
 
The wiring (p.11) seems to indicate that the remote controls the amount of current to the fan motor and the lights. A resistor burning out indicates excess current, usually caused by a short circuit (s/c) or a s/c to Earth.
 
With the fan '''disconnected from everything''', use an Ohmmeter to check the resistance between the white wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''. (this is the fan motor - I think)
 
the blue wire (or black/white stripe) ''from the fan''. (this is the lights - I think)
 
The motor may read a low resistance as might the lights but not a s/c.
 
and also between the green/yellow stripe wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''
 
the blue wire (or black /white stripe)''from the fan''
 
This will test if there is a connection between either of the two circuits, (motor and light) and earth (which there shouldn't be).
 
If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting Hunter fans at social@help.hunterfan.com. and ask if this is the case. It never hurts to ask.
 
As an aside, if you haven't already, it might be advisable to have one (or more) of these [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residual-current_device|RCD (Residual Current Device - Safety Switch)] installed in the power outlet and light circuits of the premises, as a safeguard against any future electrical problems. If it was a leakage to earth problem, the RCD would've tripped, isolating the circuit.
 
=== Update (05/03/2018) ===
 
Hi @luke ,
 
The readings for the motor seem rather high. I was expecting somewhere in the range of 30-200 Ohms for the motor winding. It may be that the run winding has burnt out and that you're reading leakage resistance through the capacitor / start winding. On starting most of the current goes through a lower resistance start winding, and if the start winding cut out switch was s/c for instance the start winding would still be "in circuit' and therefore drawing excess current burning out the resistor. This is only speculation on my part.
The readings for the motor seem rather high. I was expecting somewhere in the range of 30-200 Ohms for the motor winding. It may be that the run winding has burnt out and that you're reading leakage resistance through the capacitor / start winding. On starting most of the current goes through a lower resistance start winding, and if the start winding cut out switch was s/c for instance the start winding would still be "in circuit' and therefore drawing excess current burning out the resistor. This is only speculation on my part.
 
To find out how it is wired you'd have to dig deeper into the fan. Personally I'd go the warranty route first , if still applicable.
 
I don't know how your particular fan motor is wired but I imagined that it would be something similar to the image below. Speed being controlled by the receiver box.
 
[image|1444747]
 
,
 
What is not shown in this image is that usually there is a centrifugal switch in the motor that o/c the start winding circuit when the motor gets up to speed.
 
With the light circuit, I may have mis''LED'' (pun intended) you. I overlooked that the fan has LED lights which may account for the high reading. Did you try reversing the meter test leads when you tested the 'light' circuit, just to check if the reading was different?

Status:

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Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi @luke ,
 
Here is a link to the [https://fanbase.hunterfan.com/SupportDocuments/OwnersManuals/M3571-01.pdf|User/Installation manual] (found from [https://www.hunterfan.com/ceiling-fans/contempo-with-light-54-inch-fam125|this] webpage).
 
The wiring (p.11) seems to indicate that the remote controls the amount of current to the fan motor and the lights. A resistor burning out indicates excess current, usually caused by a short circuit (s/c) or a s/c to Earth.
 
With the fan '''disconnected from everything''', use an Ohmmeter to check the resistance between the white wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''. (this is the fan motor - I think)
 
the blue wire (or black/white stripe) ''from the fan''. (this is the lights - I think)
 
The motor may read a low resistance as might the lights but not a s/c.
 
and also between the green/yellow stripe wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''
 
the blue wire (or black /white stripe)''from the fan''
 
This will test if there is a connection between either of the two circuits, (motor and light) and earth (which there shouldn't be).
 
If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting Hunter fans at social@help.hunterfan.com. and ask if this is the case. It never hurts to ask.
 
As an aside, if you haven't already, it might be advisable to have one (or more) of these [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residual-current_device|RCD (Residual Current Device - Safety Switch)] installed in the power outlet and light circuits of the premises, as a safeguard against any future electrical problems. If it was a leakage to earth problem, the RCD would've tripped, isolating the circuit.
 
=== Update (05/03/2018) ===
 
Hi @luke ,
 
The readings for the motor seem rather high. I was expecting somewhere in the range of 30-200 Ohms for the motor winding. It may be that the winding has burnt out and that you're reading leakage resistance through the capacitor / start winding. On starting most of the current goes through a lower resistance start winding, and if the start winding cut out switch was faultys/c for instance itthe start winding would still be "in circuit' and therefore drawing excess current burning out the resistor. This is only speculation on my part.
The readings for the motor seem rather high. I was expecting somewhere in the range of 30-200 Ohms for the motor winding. It may be that the winding has burnt out and that you're reading leakage resistance through the capacitor / start winding. On starting most of the current goes through a lower resistance start winding, and if the start winding cut out switch was faultys/c for instance itthe start winding would still be "in circuit' and therefore drawing excess current burning out the resistor. This is only speculation on my part.
 
To find out how it is wired you'd have to dig deeper into the fan. Personally I'd go the warranty route first , if still applicable.
 
I don't know how your particular fan motor is wired but I imagined that it would be something similar to the image below. Speed being controlled by the receiver box.
 
[image|1444747]
 
,
 
What is not shown in this image is that usually there is a centrifugal switch in the motor that o/c the start winding circuit when the motor gets up to speed.
 
With the light circuit, I may have mis''LED'' (pun intended) you. I overlooked that the fan has LED lights which may account for the high reading. Did you try reversing the meter test leads when you tested the 'light' circuit, just to check if the reading was different?

Status:

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Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi @luke ,
 
Here is a link to the [https://fanbase.hunterfan.com/SupportDocuments/OwnersManuals/M3571-01.pdf|User/Installation manual] (found from [https://www.hunterfan.com/ceiling-fans/contempo-with-light-54-inch-fam125|this] webpage).
 
The wiring (p.11) seems to indicate that the remote controls the amount of current to the fan motor and the lights. A resistor burning out indicates excess current, usually caused by a short circuit (s/c) or a s/c to Earth.
 
With the fan '''disconnected from everything''', use an Ohmmeter to check the resistance between the white wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''. (this is the fan motor - I think)
 
the blue wire (or black/white stripe) ''from the fan''. (this is the lights - I think)
 
The motor may read a low resistance as might the lights but not a s/c.
 
and also between the green/yellow stripe wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''
 
the blue wire (or black /white stripe)''from the fan''
 
This will test if there is a connection between either of the two circuits, (motor and light) and earth (which there shouldn't be).
 
If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting Hunter fans at social@help.hunterfan.com. and ask if this is the case. It never hurts to ask.
 
As an aside, if you haven't already, it might be advisable to have one (or more) of these [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residual-current_device|RCD (Residual Current Device - Safety Switch)] installed in the power outlet and light circuits of the premises, as a safeguard against any future electrical problems. If it was a leakage to earth problem, the RCD would've tripped, isolating the circuit.
 
=== Update (05/03/2018) ===
 
Hi @luke ,
 
The readings for the motor seem rather high. I was expecting somewhere in the range of 30-200 Ohms for the motor winding. It may be that the winding has burnt out and that you're reading leakage resistance through the capacitorcapacitor / start winding. On starting most of the current goes through a lower resistance start winding, and if the start winding cut out switch was faulty for instance it would still be "in circuit' and therefore drawing excess current burning out the resistor. This is only speculation on my part.
The readings for the motor seem rather high. I was expecting somewhere in the range of 30-200 Ohms for the motor winding. It may be that the winding has burnt out and that you're reading leakage resistance through the capacitorcapacitor / start winding. On starting most of the current goes through a lower resistance start winding, and if the start winding cut out switch was faulty for instance it would still be "in circuit' and therefore drawing excess current burning out the resistor. This is only speculation on my part.
 
To find out how it is wired you'd have to dig deeper into the fan. Personally I'd go the warranty route first , if still applicable.
 
I don't know how your particular fan motor is wired but I imagined that it would be something similar to the image below. Speed being controlled by the receiver box.
 
[image|1444747]
 
,
 
What is not shown in this image is that usually there is a centrifugal switch in the motor that o/c the start winding circuit when the motor gets up to speed.
 
With the light circuit, I may have mis''LED'' (pun intended) you. I overlooked that the fan has LED lights which may account for the high reading. Did you try reversing the meter test leads when you tested the 'light' circuit, just to check if the reading was different?

Status:

open

Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi @luke ,
 
Here is a link to the [https://fanbase.hunterfan.com/SupportDocuments/OwnersManuals/M3571-01.pdf|User/Installation manual] (found from [https://www.hunterfan.com/ceiling-fans/contempo-with-light-54-inch-fam125|this] webpage).
 
The wiring (p.11) seems to indicate that the remote controls the amount of current to the fan motor and the lights. A resistor burning out indicates excess current, usually caused by a short circuit (s/c) or a s/c to Earth.
 
With the fan '''disconnected from everything''', use an Ohmmeter to check the resistance between the white wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''. (this is the fan motor - I think)
 
the blue wire (or black/white stripe) ''from the fan''. (this is the lights - I think)
 
The motor may read a low resistance as might the lights but not a s/c.
 
and also between the green/yellow stripe wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''
 
the blue wire (or black /white stripe)''from the fan''
 
This will test if there is a connection between either of the two circuits, (motor and light) and earth (which there shouldn't be).
 
If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting Hunter fans at social@help.hunterfan.com. and ask if this is the case. It never hurts to ask.
 
As an aside, if you haven't already, it might be advisable to have one (or more) of these [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residual-current_device|RCD (Residual Current Device - Safety Switch)] installed in the power outlet and light circuits of the premises, as a safeguard against any future electrical problems. If it was a leakage to earth problem, the RCD would've tripped, isolating the circuit.
 
=== Update (05/03/2018) ===
 
Hi @luke ,
 
The readings for the motor seem rather high. I was expecting somewhere in the range of 30-200 Ohms for the motor winding. It may be that the winding has burnt out and that you're reading leakage resistance through the capacitor. This is only speculation on my part.
 
To find out how it is wired you'd have to dig deeper into the fan. Personally I'd go the warranty route first , if still applicable.
 
I don't know how your particular fan motor is wired but I imagined that it would be something similar to the image below. Speed being controlled by the receiver box.
I don't know how your particular fan motor is wired but I imagined that it would be something similar to the image below. Speed being controlled by the receiver box.
 
[image|1444747]
 
,
 
What is not shown in this image is that usually there is a centrifugal switch in the motor that o/c the start winding circuit when the motor gets up to speed.
 
With the light circuit, I may have mis''LED'' (pun intended) you. I overlooked that the fan has LED lights which may account for the high reading. Did you try reversing the meter test leads when you tested the 'light' circuit, just to check if the reading was different?

Status:

open

Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi @luke ,
 
Here is a link to the [https://fanbase.hunterfan.com/SupportDocuments/OwnersManuals/M3571-01.pdf|User/Installation manual] (found from [https://www.hunterfan.com/ceiling-fans/contempo-with-light-54-inch-fam125|this] webpage).
 
The wiring (p.11) seems to indicate that the remote controls the amount of current to the fan motor and the lights. A resistor burning out indicates excess current, usually caused by a short circuit (s/c) or a s/c to Earth.
 
With the fan '''disconnected from everything''', use an Ohmmeter to check the resistance between the white wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''. (this is the fan motor - I think)
 
the blue wire (or black/white stripe) ''from the fan''. (this is the lights - I think)
 
The motor may read a low resistance as might the lights but not a s/c.
 
and also between the green/yellow stripe wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''
 
the blue wire (or black /white stripe)''from the fan''
 
This will test if there is a connection between either of the two circuits, (motor and light) and earth (which there shouldn't be).
 
If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting Hunter fans at social@help.hunterfan.com. and ask if this is the case. It never hurts to ask.
 
As an aside, if you haven't already, it might be advisable to have one (or more) of these [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residual-current_device|RCD (Residual Current Device - Safety Switch)] installed in the power outlet and light circuits of the premises, as a safeguard against any future electrical problems. If it was a leakage to earth problem, the RCD would've tripped, isolating the circuit.
 
=== Update (05/03/2018) ===
 
Hi @luke ,
Hi @luke ,
The readings for the motor seem rather high. I was expecting somewhere in the range of 30-200 Ohms for the motor winding. It may be that the winding has burnt out and that you're reading leakage resistance through the capacitor. This is only speculation on my part.
 
To find out how it is wired you'd have to dig deeper into the fan. Personally I'd go the warranty route first , if still applicable.
I
I
don't know how your particular fan motor is wired but I imagined that it would be something similar to the image below. [image|1444747],

[image|1444747]

,
I
I
don't know how your particular fan motor is wired but I imagined that it would be something similar to the image below. [image|1444747],

[image|1444747]

,
What is not shown in this image is that usually there is a centrifugal switch in the motor that o/c the start winding circuit when the motor gets up to speed.
With
With
the light circuit, I may have mis''ledmis''LED'' (pun not intended) you. I overlooked that the fan has LED lights which may account for the high reading. Did you try reversing the meter test leads when you tested the 'light' circuit, just to check if the reading was different?
With
With
the light circuit, I may have mis''ledmis''LED'' (pun not intended) you. I overlooked that the fan has LED lights which may account for the high reading. Did you try reversing the meter test leads when you tested the 'light' circuit, just to check if the reading was different?

Status:

open

Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi @luke ,
 
Here is a link to the [https://fanbase.hunterfan.com/SupportDocuments/OwnersManuals/M3571-01.pdf|User/Installation manual] (found from [https://www.hunterfan.com/ceiling-fans/contempo-with-light-54-inch-fam125|this] webpage).
 
The wiring (p.11) seems to indicate that the remote controls the amount of current to the fan motor and the lights. A resistor burning out indicates excess current, usually caused by a short circuit (s/c) or a s/c to Earth.
 
With the fan '''disconnected from everything''', use an Ohmmeter to check the resistance between the white wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''. (this is the fan motor - I think)
 
the blue wire (or black/white stripe) ''from the fan''. (this is the lights - I think)
 
The motor may read a low resistance as might the lights but not a s/c.
 
and also between the green/yellow stripe wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''
 
the blue wire (or black /white stripe)''from the fan''
 
This will test if there is a connection between either of the two circuits, (motor and light) and earth (which there shouldn't be).
 
If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting Hunter fans at social@help.hunterfan.com. and ask if this is the case. It never hurts to ask.
 
As an aside, if you haven't already, it might be advisable to have one (or more) of these [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residual-current_device|RCD (Residual Current Device - Safety Switch)] installed in the power outlet and light circuits of the premises, as a safeguard against any future electrical problems. If it was a leakage to earth problem, the RCD would've tripped, isolating the circuit.
 
=== Update (05/03/2018) ===
 
Hi @luke ,
The readings for the motor seem rather high. I was expecting somewhere in the range of 30-200 Ohms for the motor winding. It may be that the winding has burnt out and that you're reading leakage resistance through the capacitor. This is only speculation on my part.
To find out how it is wired you'd have to dig deeper into the fan. Personally I'd go the warranty route first , if still applicable.
I don't know how your particular fan motor is wired but I imagined that it would be something similar to the image below. [image|1444747],
What is not shown in this image is that usually there is a centrifugal switch in the motor that o/c the start winding circuit when the motor gets up to speed.
With the light circuit, I may have mis''led'' (pun not intended) you. I overlooked that the fan has LED lights which may account for the high reading. Did you try reversing the meter test leads when you tested the 'light' circuit, just to check if the reading was different?

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Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

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Hi @luke ,
 
Here is a link to the [https://fanbase.hunterfan.com/SupportDocuments/OwnersManuals/M3571-01.pdf|User/Installation manual] (found from [https://www.hunterfan.com/ceiling-fans/contempo-with-light-54-inch-fam125|this] webpage).
 
The wiring (p.11) seems to indicate that the remote controls the amount of current to the fan motor and the lights. A resistor burning out indicates excess current, usually caused by a short circuit (s/c) or a s/c to Earth.
 
With the fan '''disconnected from everything''', use an Ohmmeter to check the resistance between the white wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''. (this is the fan motor - I think)
 
the blue wire (or black/white stripe) ''from the fan''. (this is the lights - I think)
 
The motor may read a low resistance as might the lights but not a s/c.
 
and also between the green/yellow stripe wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''
 
the blue wire (or black /white stripe)''from the fan''
 
This will test if there is a connection between either of the two circuits, (motor and light) and earth (which there shouldn't be).
 
If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting Hunter fans at social@help.hunterfan.com. and ask if this is the case. It never hurts to ask.
 
As an aside, if you haven't already, it might be advisable to have one (or more) of these [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residual-current_device|RCD (Residual Current Device - Safety Switch)] installed in the power outlet and light circuits of the premises, as a safeguard against any future electrical problems. If it was a leakage to earth problem, the RCD would've tripped, isolating the circuit.
As an aside, if you haven't already, it might be advisable to have one (or more) of these [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residual-current_device|RCD (Residual Current Device - Safety Switch)] installed in the power outlet and light circuits of the premises, as a safeguard against any future electrical problems. If it was a leakage to earth problem, the RCD would've tripped, isolating the circuit.

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Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

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Hi @luke ,
 
Here is a link to the [https://fanbase.hunterfan.com/SupportDocuments/OwnersManuals/M3571-01.pdf|User/Installation manual] (found from [https://www.hunterfan.com/ceiling-fans/contempo-with-light-54-inch-fam125|this] webpage).
 
The wiring (p.11) seems to indicate that the remote controls the amount of current to the fan motor and the lights. A resistor burning out indicates excess current, usually caused by a short circuit (s/c) or a s/c to Earth.
 
With the fan '''disconnected from everything''', use an Ohmmeter to check the resistance between the white wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''. (this is the fan motor - I think)
 
the blue wire (or black/white stripe) ''from the fan''. (this is the lights - I think)
the blue wire (or black/white stripe) ''from the fan''. (this is the lights - I think)
 
The motor may read a low resistance as might the lights but not a s/c.
 
and also between the green/yellow stripe wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''
 
the blue wire ''from(or black /white stripe)''from the fan''
the blue wire ''from(or black /white stripe)''from the fan''
 
This will test if there is a connection between either of the two circuits, (motor and light) and earth (which there shouldn't be).
 
If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting Hunter fans at social@help.hunterfan.com. and ask if this is the case. It never hurts to ask.
 
As an aside, if you haven't already, it might be advisable to have one (or more) of these [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residual-current_device|RCD (Residual Current Device - Safety Switch)] installed in the power circuits of the premises, as a safeguard against any future electrical problems. If it was a leakage to earth problem, the RCD would've tripped, isolating the circuit.

Status:

open

Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi @luke ,
 
Here is a link to the [https://fanbase.hunterfan.com/SupportDocuments/OwnersManuals/M3571-01.pdf|User/Installation manual] (found from [https://www.hunterfan.com/ceiling-fans/contempo-with-light-54-inch-fam125|this] webpage).
 
The wiring (p.11) seems to indicate that the remote controls the amount of current to the fan motor and the lights. A resistor burning out indicates excess current, usually caused by a short circuit (s/c) or a s/c to Earth.
 
With the fan '''disconnected from everything''', use an Ohmmeter to check the resistance between the white wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''. (this is the fan motor - I think)
 
the blue wire ''from the fan''. (this is the lights - I think)
 
The motor may read a low resistance as might the lights but not a s/c.
 
and also between the green/yellow stripe wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''
 
the blue wire ''from the fan''
 
This will test if there is a connection between either of the two circuits, (motor and light) and earth (which there shouldn't be).
 
If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting Hunter fans at social@help.hunterfan.com. and ask if this is the case. It never hurts to ask.
 
As an aside, if you haven't already, it might be advisable to have one (or more) of these [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residual-current_device|RCD (Residual Current Device - Safety Switch)] installed in the power circuitscircuits of the premises, as a safeguard against any future electrical problems. If it was a leakage to earth problem, the RCD would've tripped, isolating the circuit.
As an aside, if you haven't already, it might be advisable to have one (or more) of these [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residual-current_device|RCD (Residual Current Device - Safety Switch)] installed in the power circuitscircuits of the premises, as a safeguard against any future electrical problems. If it was a leakage to earth problem, the RCD would've tripped, isolating the circuit.

Status:

open

Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi @luke ,
 
Here is a link to the [https://fanbase.hunterfan.com/SupportDocuments/OwnersManuals/M3571-01.pdf|User/Installation manual] (found from [https://www.hunterfan.com/ceiling-fans/contempo-with-light-54-inch-fam125|this] webpage).
 
The wiring (p.11) seems to indicate that the remote controls the amount of current to the fan motor and the lights. A resistor burning out indicates excess current, usually caused by a short circuit (s/c) or a s/c to Earth.
 
With the fan '''disconnected from everything''', use an Ohmmeter to check the resistance between the white wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''. (this is the fan motor - I think)
 
the blue wire ''from the fan''. (this is the lights - I think)
 
The motor may read a low resistance as might the lights but not a s/c.
 
and also between the green/yellow stripe wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''
 
the blue wire ''from the fan''
 
This will test if there is a connection between either of the two circuits, (motor and light) and earth (which there shouldn't be).
 
If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting Hunter fans at social@help.hunterfan.com. and ask if this is the case. It never hurts to ask.
 
As an aside, if you haven't already, it might be advisable to have one (or more) of these [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residual-current_device|RCD (residualResidual Current Device - Safety Switch)] installed in the power circuits, as a safeguard against any future electrical problems. If it was a leakage to earth problem, the RCD would've tripped, isolating the circuit.
As an aside, if you haven't already, it might be advisable to have one (or more) of these [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residual-current_device|RCD (residualResidual Current Device - Safety Switch)] installed in the power circuits, as a safeguard against any future electrical problems. If it was a leakage to earth problem, the RCD would've tripped, isolating the circuit.

Status:

open

Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi @luke ,
 
Here is a link to the [https://fanbase.hunterfan.com/SupportDocuments/OwnersManuals/M3571-01.pdf|User/Installation manual] (found from [https://www.hunterfan.com/ceiling-fans/contempo-with-light-54-inch-fam125|this] webpage).
 
The wiring (p.11) seems to indicate that the remote controls the amount of current to the fan motor and the lights. A resistor burning out indicates excess current, usually caused by a short circuit (s/c) or a s/c to Earth.
 
With the fan '''disconnected from everything''', use an Ohmmeter to check the resistance between the white wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''. (this is the fan motor - I think)
 
the blue wire ''from the fan''. (this is the lights - I think)
 
The motor may read a low resistance as might the lights but not a s/c.
 
and also between the green/yellow stripe wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''
 
the blue wire ''from the fan''
 
This will test if there is a connection between either of the two circuits, (motor and light) and earth (which there shouldn't be).
 
If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting Hunter fans at social@help.hunterfan.com. and ask if this is the case. It never hurts to ask.
 
As an asideaside, if you haven't already, it might be advisable to have one (or more) of these [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residual-current_device|RCD (residual Current Device - Safety Switch)] installed in the power circuits, as a safeguard against any future electrical problems. If it was a leakage to earth problem, the RCD would've tripped, isolating the circuit.
As an asideaside, if you haven't already, it might be advisable to have one (or more) of these [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residual-current_device|RCD (residual Current Device - Safety Switch)] installed in the power circuits, as a safeguard against any future electrical problems. If it was a leakage to earth problem, the RCD would've tripped, isolating the circuit.

Status:

open

Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi @luke ,
 
Here is a link to the [https://fanbase.hunterfan.com/SupportDocuments/OwnersManuals/M3571-01.pdf|User/Installation manual] (found from [https://www.hunterfan.com/ceiling-fans/contempo-with-light-54-inch-fam125|this] webpage).
 
The wiring (p.11) seems to indicate that the remote controls the amount of current to the fan motor and the lights. A resistor burning out indicates excess current, usually caused by a short circuit (s/c) or a s/c to Earth.
 
With the fan '''disconnected from everything''', use an Ohmmeter to check the resistance between the white wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''. (this is the fan motor - I think)
 
the blue wire ''from the fan''. (this is the lights - I think)
 
The motor may read a low resistance as might the lights but not a s/c.
 
and also between the green/yellow stripe wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''
 
the blue wire ''from the fan''
 
This will test if there is a connection between either of the two circuits, (motor and light) and earth (which there shouldn't be).
 
If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting Hunter fans at social@help.hunterfan.com. and ask if this is the case. It never hurts to ask.
 
As an aside it might be advisable to have one (or more) of these [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residual-current_device|RCD (residual Current Device - Safety Switch)] installed in the power circuits, as a safeguard against any future electrical problems. If it was a leakage to earth problem, the RCD would've tripped, isolating the circuit.
If there is a problem such as leakage to earth etc

Status:

open

Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi @luke ,
 
Here is a link to the [https://fanbase.hunterfan.com/SupportDocuments/OwnersManuals/M3571-01.pdf|User/Installation manual] (found from [https://www.hunterfan.com/ceiling-fans/contempo-with-light-54-inch-fam125|this] webpage).
 
The wiring (p.11) seems to indicate that the remote controls the amount of current to the fan motor and the lights. A resistor burning out indicates excess current, usually caused by a short circuit (s/c) or a s/c to Earth.
 
With the fan '''disconnected from everything''', use an Ohmmeter to check the resistance between the white wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''. (this is the fan motor - I think)
 
the blue wire ''from the fan''. (this is the lights - I think)
 
The motor may read a low resistance as might the lights but not a s/c.
 
and also between the green/yellow stripe wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''
 
the blue wire ''from the fan''
 
This will test if there is a connection between either of the two circuits, (motor and light) and earth (which there shouldn't be).
 
If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting Hunter fans at social@help.hunterfan.com. and ask if this is the case. It never hurts to ask.
As an aside it might be advisable to have one (or more) of these [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residual-current_device|RCD (residual Current Device - Safety Switch)] installed in the power circuits, as a safeguard against any future electrical problems. If it was a leakage to earth problem, the RCD would've tripped, isolating the circuit.
If there is a problem such as leakage to earth etc

Status:

open

Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi @luke ,
 
Here is a link to the [https://fanbase.hunterfan.com/SupportDocuments/OwnersManuals/M3571-01.pdf|User/Installation manual] (found from [https://www.hunterfan.com/ceiling-fans/contempo-with-light-54-inch-fam125|this] webpage).
 
The wiring (p.11) seems to indicate that the remote controls the amount of current to the fan motor and the lights. A resistor burning out indicates excess current, usually caused by a short circuit (s/c) or a s/c to Earth.
 
With the fan '''disconnected from everything''', use an Ohmmeter to check the resistance between the white wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''. (this is the fan motor - I think)
 
the blue wire ''from the fan''. (this is the lights - I think)
 
The motor may read a low resistance as might the lights but not a s/c.
 
and also between the green/yellow stripe wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''
 
the blue wire ''from the fan''
 
This will test if there is a connection between either of the two circuits, (motor and light) and earth (which there shouldn't be).
 
If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting Hunter fans at social@help.hunterfan.com. and ask if this is the case. It never hurts to ask.
If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting Hunter fans at social@help.hunterfan.com. and ask if this is the case. It never hurts to ask.

Status:

open

Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi @luke ,
 
Here is a link to the [https://fanbase.hunterfan.com/SupportDocuments/OwnersManuals/M3571-01.pdf|User/Installation manual] (found from [https://www.hunterfan.com/ceiling-fans/contempo-with-light-54-inch-fam125|this] webpage).
 
The wiring (p.11) seems to indicate that the remote controls the amount of current to the fan motor and the lights. A resistor burning out indicates excess current, usually caused by a short circuit (s/c) or a s/c to Earth.
 
With the fan '''disconnected from everything''', use an Ohmmeter to check the resistance between the white wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''. (this is the fan motor - I think)
 
the blue wire ''from the fan''. (this is the lights - I think)
 
The motor may read a low resistance as might the lights but not a s/c.
 
and also between the green/yellow stripe wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''
 
the blue wire ''from the fan''
 
This will test if there is a connection between either of the two circuits, (motor and light) and earth (which there shouldn't be).
 
If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting themHunter fans at social@help.hunterfan.com. if this is the case. It never hurts to ask.
If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting themHunter fans at social@help.hunterfan.com. if this is the case. It never hurts to ask.

Status:

open

Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi @luke ,
 
Here is a link to the [https://fanbase.hunterfan.com/SupportDocuments/OwnersManuals/M3571-01.pdf|User/Installation manual] (found from [https://www.hunterfan.com/ceiling-fans/contempo-with-light-54-inch-fam125|this] webpage).
 
The wiring (p.11) seems to indicate that the remote controls the amount of current to the fan motor and the lights. A resistor burning out indicates excess current, usually caused by a short circuit (s/c) or a s/c to Earth.
 
With the fan '''disconnected from everything''', use an Ohmmeter to check the resistance between the white wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''. (this is the fan motor - I think)
 
the blue wire ''from the fan''. (this is the lights - I think)
 
The motor may read a low resistance as might the lights but not a s/c.
 
and also between the green/yellow stripe wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''
 
the blue wire ''from the fan''
 
This will test if there is a connection between either of the two circuits, (motor and light) and earth (which there shouldn't be).
This will test if there is a connection between either of the two circuits, (motor and light) and earth (which there shouldn't be).
 
If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting them at social@help.hunterfan.com.

Status:

open

Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi @luke ,
 
Here is a link to the [https://fanbase.hunterfan.com/SupportDocuments/OwnersManuals/M3571-01.pdf|User/Installation manual] (found from [https://www.hunterfan.com/ceiling-fans/contempo-with-light-54-inch-fam125|this] webpage).
 
The wiring (p.11) seems to indicate that the remote controls the amount of current to the fan motor and the lightslights. A resistor burning out indicates excess current, usually caused by a short circuit (s/c) or a s/c to Earth.
The wiring (p.11) seems to indicate that the remote controls the amount of current to the fan motor and the lightslights. A resistor burning out indicates excess current, usually caused by a short circuit (s/c) or a s/c to Earth.
 
With the fan '''disconnected from everything''', use an Ohmmeter to check the resistance between the white wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''. (this is the fan motor - I think)
 
the blue wire ''from the fan''. (this is the lights - I think)
 
The motor may read a low resistance as might the lights but not a s/c.
 
and also between the green/yellow stripe wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''
 
the blue wire ''from the fan''
 
This will test if there is a connection between the two circuits, (motor and light) and earth (which there shouldn't be).
 
If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting them at social@help.hunterfan.com.

Status:

open

Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi @luke ,
 
Here is a link to the [https://fanbase.hunterfan.com/SupportDocuments/OwnersManuals/M3571-01.pdf|User/Installation manual] (found from [https://www.hunterfan.com/ceiling-fans/contempo-with-light-54-inch-fam125|this] webpage).
 
The wiring (p.11) seems to indicate that the remote controls the amount of current to the fan motor and the lights
 
With the fan '''disconnected from everything''', use an Ohmmeter to check the resistance between the white wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''. (this is the fan motor - I think)
 
the blue wire ''from the fan''. (this is the lights - I think)
 
The motor may read a low resistance as might the lights but not a s/c.
 
and also between the yellow/greengreen/yellow stripe wire ''from the fan'' and:
and also between the yellow/greengreen/yellow stripe wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''
 
the blue wire ''from the fan''
 
This will test if there is a connection between the two circuits, (motor and light) and earth (which there shouldn't be).
 
If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting them at social@help.hunterfan.com.

Status:

open

Bewerkt door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi @luke ,
 
Here is a link to the [https://fanbase.hunterfan.com/SupportDocuments/OwnersManuals/M3571-01.pdf|User/Installation manual] (found from [https://www.hunterfan.com/ceiling-fans/contempo-with-light-54-inch-fam125|this] webpage).
 
The wiring (p.11) seems to indicate that the remote controls the amount of current to the fan motor and the lights
 
With the fan disconnected'''disconnected from everythingeverything''', use an Ohmmeter to check the resistance between the white wire ''from the fan'' and:
With the fan disconnected'''disconnected from everythingeverything''', use an Ohmmeter to check the resistance between the white wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''. (this is the fan motor - I think)
 
the blue wire ''from the fan''. (this is the lights - I think)
 
The motor may read a low resistance as might the lights but not a s/c.
 
and also between the yellow/green stripe wire ''from the fan'' and:
 
the black wire ''from the fan''
 
the blue wire ''from the fan''
 
This will test if there is a connection between the two circuits, (motor and light) and earth (which there shouldn't be).
 
If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting them at social@help.hunterfan.com.

Status:

open

Origineel bericht door: jayeff ,

Tekst:

Hi @luke ,

Here is a link to the [https://fanbase.hunterfan.com/SupportDocuments/OwnersManuals/M3571-01.pdf|User/Installation manual] (found from [https://www.hunterfan.com/ceiling-fans/contempo-with-light-54-inch-fam125|this] webpage).

The wiring (p.11) seems to indicate that the remote controls the amount of current to the fan motor and the lights

With the fan disconnected from everything, use an Ohmmeter to check the resistance between the white wire ''from the fan'' and:

the black wire ''from the fan''. (this is the fan motor - I think)

the blue wire ''from the fan''. (this is the lights - I think)

The motor may read a low resistance as might the lights but not a s/c.

and also between the yellow/green stripe wire ''from the fan'' and:

the black wire ''from the fan''

the blue wire ''from the fan''

This will test if there is a connection between the two circuits, (motor and light) and earth (which there shouldn't be).

If the fan motor is the problem, as it is less than 12 months old it may be that it is still covered by the ''Limited Lifetime Motor Warranty''. You could try contacting them at social@help.hunterfan.com.

Status:

open