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Yes, but there are no guarantees the system will boot with your old configuration or operating system. It typically works if the system is similar, but if it’s too radically different you may need to take a backup and start over.
 
The reason this generally ends up working is Max OS X is more receptive to total system changes compared to Windows. It doesn’t always work (Ex: Core Duo original to a Core 2 Duo/Core i series with a dual video subsystem may not boot), but it usually does in most situations well enough to get your data and wipe the system.

You can’t swap a PPC install with a Intel system
'''PPC->Intel (or vice versa), but thisversa) doesn’t work. This is the only majora well known limitation that’s guaranteed to break the ability for it to boot your old installation.on how far you can take it.'''
The reason this generally ends up working is Max OS X is more receptive to total system changes compared to Windows. It doesn’t always work (Ex: Core Duo original to a Core 2 Duo/Core i series with a dual video subsystem may not boot), but it usually does in most situations well enough to get your data and wipe the system.

You can’t swap a PPC install with a Intel system
'''PPC->Intel (or vice versa), but thisversa) doesn’t work. This is the only majora well known limitation that’s guaranteed to break the ability for it to boot your old installation.on how far you can take it.'''
 
If you can, I would see if you can get the system working well enough to do a Time Machine backup and have that as a failsafe just in case (or to have a backup to start fresh if the old install is due for a refresh anyway). If it can’t be salvaged, the old OS usually works passably to get your data backed up so you can restart with a fresh installation on the new system.

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Yes, but there are no guarantees the system will boot with your old configuration or operating system. It typically works if the system is similar, but if it’s too radically different you may need to take a backup and start over.
 
The reason this generally ends up working is Max OS X is more receptive to total system changes compared to Windows. It doesn’t always work (Ex: Core Duo original to a Core 2 Duo/Core i series with a dual video subsystem may not boot), but it usually does in most situations well enough to get your data and wipe the system.
 
You can’t swap a PPC install with a Intel system (or vice versa), but this is the only major limitation that’s guaranteed to break the ability for it to boot your old installation.
 
If you can, I would see if you can get the system working well enough to do a Time Machine backup and have that as a failsafe just in case (or to have a backup to start fresh if the old install is due for a refresh anyway). If notit can’t be salvaged, the old OS usually works passably to get your data backed up so you can restart with a fresh installation on the new system.
If you can, I would see if you can get the system working well enough to do a Time Machine backup and have that as a failsafe just in case (or to have a backup to start fresh if the old install is due for a refresh anyway). If notit can’t be salvaged, the old OS usually works passably to get your data backed up so you can restart with a fresh installation on the new system.

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Bewerkt door: Nick ,

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Yes, but there are no guarantees the system will boot with your old configuration or operating system. It typically works if the system is similar, but if it’s too radically different you may need to take a backup and start over.
 
The reason this generally ends up working is Max OS X is more receptive to total system changes compared to Windows. It doesn’t always work (Ex: Core Duo original to a Core 2 Duo/Core i series with a dual video subsystem may not boot), but it usually does in most situations well enough to get your data and wipe the system.
 
You can’t swap a PPC install with a Intel system (or vice versa), but this is the only major limitation that’s guaranteed to break the ability for it to boot your old installation.
 
If you can, I would see if you can get the system working well enough to do a Time Machine backup and have that as a failsafe just in case or so you can(or to have a backup to start overfresh if yourthe old install is bogged downdue for a refresh anyway). If not, the old OS usually works passably to get your data backed up so you can restart with a fresh installation on the new system.
If you can, I would see if you can get the system working well enough to do a Time Machine backup and have that as a failsafe just in case or so you can(or to have a backup to start overfresh if yourthe old install is bogged downdue for a refresh anyway). If not, the old OS usually works passably to get your data backed up so you can restart with a fresh installation on the new system.

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Bewerkt door: Nick ,

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Yes, but there are no guarantees the system will boot with your old configuration or operating system. It typically works if the system is similar, but if it’s too radically different you may need to take a backup and start over.
 
The reason this generally ends up working is Max OS X as a whole is more receptive to total system changes compared to Windows. It doesn’t always work (Ex: Core Duo original to a Core 2 Duo/Core i series with a dual video subsystem can create a no boot scenariomay not boot), but it usually does in most situationssituations well enough to get your data and wipe the system.
The reason this generally ends up working is Max OS X as a whole is more receptive to total system changes compared to Windows. It doesn’t always work (Ex: Core Duo original to a Core 2 Duo/Core i series with a dual video subsystem can create a no boot scenariomay not boot), but it usually does in most situationssituations well enough to get your data and wipe the system.
 
You can’t swap a PPC install with a Intel system (or vice versa), but this is the only major limitation that’s guaranteed to break the ability for it to boot your old installation.
 
If you can, I would get the system working well enough to do a Time Machine backup and have that as a failsafe just in case or so you can start over if your old install is bogged down. If not, the old OS usually works passably to get your data backed up so you can restart with a fresh installation on the new system.

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Bewerkt door: Nick ,

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Yes, this can be done but there are no guarantees the system will boot with youryour old configuration or operating system configuration. However, you may run into an issuesystem. It typically works if your newthe system is similar, but if it’s too radically different. If this is the casedifferent you may need to rely on backupstake a backup and start over.
Yes, this can be done but there are no guarantees the system will boot with youryour old configuration or operating system configuration. However, you may run into an issuesystem. It typically works if your newthe system is similar, but if it’s too radically different. If this is the casedifferent you may need to rely on backupstake a backup and start over.
 
The reason this generally ends up working is Max OS X as a whole is more receptive to a total hardware changesystem changes compared to Windows. It doesn'tdoesn’t always work every time(Ex: Core Duo original to a Core 2 Duo/Core i series with a dual video subsystem can create a no boot scenario), but it usually bootsdoes in a completely different system more often then it doesn't. As long as the hardware is similar or better then your old machine you generally don't run into an issue doing this. You can't do a PPC->Intel swap but a C2D->Core i series swap is likely to boot without any issuesmost situations.
The reason this generally ends up working is Max OS X as a whole is more receptive to a total hardware changesystem changes compared to Windows. It doesn'tdoesn’t always work every time(Ex: Core Duo original to a Core 2 Duo/Core i series with a dual video subsystem can create a no boot scenario), but it usually bootsdoes in a completely different system more often then it doesn't. As long as the hardware is similar or better then your old machine you generally don't run into an issue doing this. You can't do a PPC->Intel swap but a C2D->Core i series swap is likely to boot without any issuesmost situations.
 
IfYou can’t swap a PPC install with a Intel system (or vice versa), but this is the only major limitation that’s guaranteed to break the ability for it to boot your old installation.

If
you can, I would get the system working well enough to do a Time Machine backup and have that as a failsafe. Iffailsafe just in case or so you can'tcan start over if your old install is bogged down. If not, the old OS should work well enoughusually works passably to do a Time Machine backupget your data backed up so you can makerestart with a backup that can be usedfresh installation on the new system.
IfYou can’t swap a PPC install with a Intel system (or vice versa), but this is the only major limitation that’s guaranteed to break the ability for it to boot your old installation.

If
you can, I would get the system working well enough to do a Time Machine backup and have that as a failsafe. Iffailsafe just in case or so you can'tcan start over if your old install is bogged down. If not, the old OS should work well enoughusually works passably to do a Time Machine backupget your data backed up so you can makerestart with a backup that can be usedfresh installation on the new system.

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Bewerkt door: Nick ,

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Yes, this can be donedone but there are no guarantees the system will boot with your old operating system configuration. However, you may run into an issue if your new system is radically different. If this is the case you may need to rely on backups.
Yes, this can be donedone but there are no guarantees the system will boot with your old operating system configuration. However, you may run into an issue if your new system is radically different. If this is the case you may need to rely on backups.
 
Depending on how different the new system is, you may need to reload Mac OS X. MacThe reason this generally ends up working is Max OS X as a whole is more receptive to a total hardware change compared to Windows,Windows. It doesn't work every time but it doesn't always work. In some cases, an OS reload is still required. You can generally migrate the drive tousually boots in a completely different system thatmore often then it doesn't. As long as the hardware is similar (or is only slightly different compared to the "dead" system),or better then your old machine you generally don't run into an issue doing this. You can't do a PPC->Intel swap but a hardware change where the hardwareC2D->Core i series swap is grossly different from the dead system you are replacing may not worklikely to boot without any issues.
Depending on how different the new system is, you may need to reload Mac OS X. MacThe reason this generally ends up working is Max OS X as a whole is more receptive to a total hardware change compared to Windows,Windows. It doesn't work every time but it doesn't always work. In some cases, an OS reload is still required. You can generally migrate the drive tousually boots in a completely different system thatmore often then it doesn't. As long as the hardware is similar (or is only slightly different compared to the "dead" system),or better then your old machine you generally don't run into an issue doing this. You can't do a PPC->Intel swap but a hardware change where the hardwareC2D->Core i series swap is grossly different from the dead system you are replacing may not worklikely to boot without any issues.
 
If you can, I would get the system working well enough to do a Time Machine backup and have that as a safety in the event the old installation doesn't carry overfailsafe. If you can't, the old OS should work well enough to do a Time Machine backup so you can reload the OSmake a backup that can be used on the new system.
If you can, I would get the system working well enough to do a Time Machine backup and have that as a safety in the event the old installation doesn't carry overfailsafe. If you can't, the old OS should work well enough to do a Time Machine backup so you can reload the OSmake a backup that can be used on the new system.

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Bewerkt door: Nick ,

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Yes, this can be done.
 
Depending on how different the new system is, you may need to reload Mac OS X. Mac OS X is more receptive to a total hardware change compared to Windows, but it doesn't always work. In some cases, an OS reload is still required. You can generally migrate the drive to a system that is similar (or is only slightly different compared to the "dead" system), but a hardware change where the hardware is grossly different from the dead system you are replacing may not work.
I
If you can, I
would get the system working well enough to do a Time Machine backup and have that as a safety in the event the old installation doesn't carry over. If you can't, the old OS should work well enough to do a Time Machine backup so you can reload the OS on the new system.
I
If you can, I
would get the system working well enough to do a Time Machine backup and have that as a safety in the event the old installation doesn't carry over. If you can't, the old OS should work well enough to do a Time Machine backup so you can reload the OS on the new system.

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Bewerkt door: Nick ,

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Yes, it is possible. Justthis can be awaredone.
Depending on how different the new system is,
you may haveneed to reload Mac OS X. Mac OS X ifis more receptive to a total hardware change compared to Windows, but it doesn't always work. In some cases, an OS reload is still required. You can generally migrate the drive to a system that is similar (or is only slightly different compared to the "dead" system), but a hardware change where the hardware is verygrossly different from the original system, so backup ifdead system you can first. OS X carriesare replacing may not work.
I would get the system working well enough to do
a lot better then Windows does, but you can evenTime Machine backup and have problems doing it on Macsthat as a safety in the event the old installation doesn't carry over.
Yes, it is possible. Justthis can be awaredone.
Depending on how different the new system is,
you may haveneed to reload Mac OS X. Mac OS X ifis more receptive to a total hardware change compared to Windows, but it doesn't always work. In some cases, an OS reload is still required. You can generally migrate the drive to a system that is similar (or is only slightly different compared to the "dead" system), but a hardware change where the hardware is verygrossly different from the original system, so backup ifdead system you can first. OS X carriesare replacing may not work.
I would get the system working well enough to do
a lot better then Windows does, but you can evenTime Machine backup and have problems doing it on Macsthat as a safety in the event the old installation doesn't carry over.

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Bewerkt door: Nick ,

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Yes, it is possible. Just be aware you may have to reload OS X if the hardware is grossly differentvery different from the original system, so backup if you can first. OS X carries a lot better then Windows does, but you can even have problems doing it on a Mac. Do a backup, and assume you will have to reload due to a gross hardware changeMacs.
Yes, it is possible. Just be aware you may have to reload OS X if the hardware is grossly differentvery different from the original system, so backup if you can first. OS X carries a lot better then Windows does, but you can even have problems doing it on a Mac. Do a backup, and assume you will have to reload due to a gross hardware changeMacs.

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Bewerkt door: Nick ,

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Yes, it is possible. Just be aware you may have to reload OS X if the hardware is grossly different. OS X carries a lot better then Windows does, but you can even have problems doing it on a Mac. Do a backup, and assume you will have to reload due to a gross hardware change.
Yes, it is possible. Just be aware you may have to reload OS X if the hardware is grossly different. OS X carries a lot better then Windows does, but you can even have problems doing it on a Mac. Do a backup, and assume you will have to reload due to a gross hardware change.

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Bewerkt door: Nick ,

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Yes!Yes, it is possible. Just be aware you may have to reload OS X if the hardware is grossly different. OS X carries a lot better then Windows does, but you can even have problems doing it on a Mac.
Yes!Yes, it is possible. Just be aware you may have to reload OS X if the hardware is grossly different. OS X carries a lot better then Windows does, but you can even have problems doing it on a Mac.

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Origineel bericht door: Nick ,

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Yes!

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