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Like Mayer suggested, the machine might have been on when you plugged it into the GFCI's and the surge caused them to trip. Or, you might have a nick or short of the Neutral wire in the machine itself and this causes the GFCI to trip, the three prong's added grounding might just add enough resistance to prevent the GFCI from tripping, BUT it will definitely affect the machine's performance being that its not being supplied enough power. Have a look inside the machine and play close attention to the neutral (White) wire and look for nicks or shorts in the wire. Make sure that the neutral wire is not making any contact with the ground wire or any other type of ground. It's definitely not making contact with the "Hot" ( black) wire, because if it was it would trip the breakers when plugged elsewhere. Are the GFCI's in the kitchen being used by any major apPliances? Nowadays the GFCI kitchen circuits are divided into two seperate circuits, but in older buildings you might see 4 or more GFCI's in one circuit, which isnt a good idea. After you have a look inside the machine and all is well with the wires, look to see if the Neutral wire is being "shared", or basically spliced and jumping from one terminal to the other. If this is the case, then a GFCI WILL NOT accept this type of connection, GFCI are way more sensitive than a regular receptacle. This machine should come standard with its own groung prong on its original cord, but if its European it might not. If thats the case, then I would buy a 12 gauge SJ cord with a ground prong in a hardware store and just replace the cord. That will help.
Like Mayer suggested, the machine might have been on when you plugged it into the GFCI's and the surge caused them to trip. Or, you might have a nick or short of the Neutral wire in the machine itself and this causes the GFCI to trip, the three prong's added grounding might just add enough resistance to prevent the GFCI from tripping, BUT it will definitely affect the machine's performance being that its not being supplied enough power. Have a look inside the machine and play close attention to the neutral (White) wire and look for nicks or shorts in the wire. Make sure that the neutral wire is not making any contact with the ground wire or any other type of ground. It's definitely not making contact with the "Hot" ( black) wire, because if it was it would trip the breakers when plugged elsewhere. Are the GFCI's in the kitchen being used by any major apPliances? Nowadays the GFCI kitchen circuits are divided into two seperate circuits, but in older buildings you might see 4 or more GFCI's in one circuit, which isnt a good idea. After you have a look inside the machine and all is well with the wires, look to see if the Neutral wire is being "shared", or basically spliced and jumping from one terminal to the other. If this is the case, then a GFCI WILL NOT accept this type of connection, GFCI are way more sensitive than a regular receptacle. This machine should come standard with its own groung prong on its original cord, but if its European it might not. If thats the case, then I would buy a 12 gauge SJ cord with a ground prong in a hardware store and just replace the cord. That will help.

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Origineel bericht door: Majesty ,

Tekst:

Like Mayer suggested, the machine might have been on when you plugged it into the GFCI's and the surge caused them to trip.   Or, you might have a nick or short of the Neutral wire in the machine itself and this causes the GFCI to trip, the three prong's added grounding might just add enough resistance to prevent the GFCI from tripping, BUT it will definitely affect the machine's performance being that its not being supplied enough power. Have a look inside the machine and play close attention to the neutral (White) wire and look for nicks or shorts in the wire.  Make sure that the neutral wire is not making any contact with the ground wire or any other type of ground.  It's definitely not making contact with the "Hot" ( black) wire, because if it was it would trip the breakers when plugged elsewhere.

Status:

open