Ga door naar hoofdinhoud

Repareer je spullen

Recht op reparatie

Onderdelen & Gereedschap

Help

Deze versie is geschreven door: mayer ,

Tekst:

Sure it's possible. The problem is obtaining Apple's proprietary SSD. Here's how to do it: [guide|27694]
 
OWC says you can do it but provides nothing to do it withwith, as yet.
OWC says you can do it but provides nothing to do it withwith, as yet.
 
This is a quote from OWC:
 
Apple does not intend for end users to upgrade the SSD in these models themselves. The company even has used uncommon "pentalobe" screws -- also called five-point Torx screws -- to make the upgrade more difficult. However, access is straightforward with the correct screwdriver, the SSD modules are removable, and Apple has not blocked upgrades in firmware, either.
 
As a result, third-parties, like site sponsor OWC have released SSD upgrades with a compatible connector for the "Mid-2012" and "Early 2013" models. Specifically, OWC sells the compatible Mercury Aura Pro SSD and provides the needed screwdriver as well as an Envoy Pro bus-powered external enclosure so the original SSD can be repurposed as an external drive.
 
OWC is hard at work on compatible SSDs for subsequent models and plans to release ones soon. In testing of the "Mid-2014" systems, OWC discovered that when a "blade" SSD from a Cylinder Mac Pro is installed in one of these systems, it "negotiates a x4 PCIe connection versus the stock cards, which negotiate a x2 PCIe connection." This means that the Retina Display MacBook Pro provided more than 1200 MB/s drive performance, a huge jump from the standard SSD.
 
Apple boasts that the "Mid-2015" systems have "up to 2.5 times faster flash storage than the previous generation" of 15-Inch MacBook Pro models. In independent testing, OWC confirmed these models have read speeds around 2000 MB/s and write speeds around 1200 MB/s. These numbers are in line with Apple's performance claim compared to the SSDs that the company offered with the previous models, but not compared to the maximum speed that the previous systems unofficially can support.
 
Consequently, all of these models can support larger SSDs than the ones provided by default, but some models support faster SSDs, as well.
Consequently, all of these models can support larger SSDs than the ones provided by default, but some models support faster SSDs, as well.
http://www.everymac.com/systems/apple/macbook_pro/macbook-pro-retina-display-faq/macbook-pro-retina-display-how-to-upgrade-ssd-storage.html

Status:

open

Bewerkt door: mayer ,

Tekst:

Sure it's possible. The problem is obtaining Apple's proprietary SSD. Here's how to do it: [guide|27694]
 
OWC says you can do it but provides nothing to do it with as yet.
 
This is a quote from OWC:
 
Apple does not intend for end users to upgrade the SSD in these models themselves. The company even has used uncommon "pentalobe" screws -- also called five-point Torx screws -- to make the upgrade more difficult. However, access is straightforward with the correct screwdriver, the SSD modules are removable, and Apple has not blocked upgrades in firmware, either.
 
As a result, third-parties, like site sponsor OWC have released SSD upgrades with a compatible connector for the "Mid-2012" and "Early 2013" models. Specifically, OWC sells the compatible Mercury Aura Pro SSD and provides the needed screwdriver as well as an Envoy Pro bus-powered external enclosure so the original SSD can be repurposed as an external drive.
 
OWC is hard at work on compatible SSDs for subsequent models and plans to release ones soon. In testing of the "Mid-2014" systems, OWC discovered that when a "blade" SSD from a Cylinder Mac Pro is installed in one of these systems, it "negotiates a x4 PCIe connection versus the stock cards, which negotiate a x2 PCIe connection." This means that the Retina Display MacBook Pro provided more than 1200 MB/s drive performance, a huge jump from the standard SSD.
 
Apple boasts that the "Mid-2015" systems have "up to 2.5 times faster flash storage than the previous generation" of 15-Inch MacBook Pro models. In independent testing, OWC confirmed these models have read speeds around 2000 MB/s and write speeds around 1200 MB/s. These numbers are in line with Apple's performance claim compared to the SSDs that the company offered with the previous models, but not compared to the maximum speed that the previous systems unofficially can support.
 
Consequently, all of these models can support larger SSDs than the ones provided by default, but some models support faster SSDs, as well.
http://www.everymac.com/systems/apple/macbook_pro/macbook-pro-retina-display-faq/macbook-pro-retina-display-how-to-upgrade-ssd-storage.html
Consequently, all of these models can support larger SSDs than the ones provided by default, but some models support faster SSDs, as well.
http://www.everymac.com/systems/apple/macbook_pro/macbook-pro-retina-display-faq/macbook-pro-retina-display-how-to-upgrade-ssd-storage.html

Status:

open

Bewerkt door: mayer ,

Tekst:

Sure it's possible. The problem is obtaining Apple's proprietary SSD. Here's how to do it: [guide|27694]
OWC says you can do it but provides nothing to do it with as yet.
OWC says you can do it but provides nothing to do it with as yet.
This is a quote from OWC:
 
Apple does not intend for end users to upgrade the SSD in these models themselves. The company even has used uncommon "pentalobe" screws -- also called five-point Torx screws -- to make the upgrade more difficult. However, access is straightforward with the correct screwdriver, the SSD modules are removable, and Apple has not blocked upgrades in firmware, either.
 
As a result, third-parties, like site sponsor OWC have released SSD upgrades with a compatible connector for the "Mid-2012" and "Early 2013" models. Specifically, OWC sells the compatible Mercury Aura Pro SSD and provides the needed screwdriver as well as an Envoy Pro bus-powered external enclosure so the original SSD can be repurposed as an external drive.
 
OWC is hard at work on compatible SSDs for subsequent models and plans to release ones soon. In testing of the "Mid-2014" systems, OWC discovered that when a "blade" SSD from a Cylinder Mac Pro is installed in one of these systems, it "negotiates a x4 PCIe connection versus the stock cards, which negotiate a x2 PCIe connection." This means that the Retina Display MacBook Pro provided more than 1200 MB/s drive performance, a huge jump from the standard SSD.
 
Apple boasts that the "Mid-2015" systems have "up to 2.5 times faster flash storage than the previous generation" of 15-Inch MacBook Pro models. In independent testing, OWC confirmed these models have read speeds around 2000 MB/s and write speeds around 1200 MB/s. These numbers are in line with Apple's performance claim compared to the SSDs that the company offered with the previous models, but not compared to the maximum speed that the previous systems unofficially can support.
 
Consequently, all of these models can support larger SSDs than the ones provided by default, but some models support faster SSDs, as well.

Status:

open

Bewerkt door: mayer ,

Tekst:

Sure it's possible. The problem is obtaining Apple's proprietary SSD. Here's how to do it: [guide|27694]
Sure it's possible. The problem is obtaining Apple's proprietary SSD. Here's how to do it: [guide|27694]
This is a quote from OWC:
 
Apple does not intend for end users to upgrade the SSD in these models themselves. The company even has used uncommon "pentalobe" screws -- also called five-point Torx screws -- to make the upgrade more difficult. However, access is straightforward with the correct screwdriver, the SSD modules are removable, and Apple has not blocked upgrades in firmware, either.
 
As a result, third-parties, like site sponsor OWC have released SSD upgrades with a compatible connector for the "Mid-2012" and "Early 2013" models. Specifically, OWC sells the compatible Mercury Aura Pro SSD and provides the needed screwdriver as well as an Envoy Pro bus-powered external enclosure so the original SSD can be repurposed as an external drive.
 
OWC is hard at work on compatible SSDs for subsequent models and plans to release ones soon. In testing of the "Mid-2014" systems, OWC discovered that when a "blade" SSD from a Cylinder Mac Pro is installed in one of these systems, it "negotiates a x4 PCIe connection versus the stock cards, which negotiate a x2 PCIe connection." This means that the Retina Display MacBook Pro provided more than 1200 MB/s drive performance, a huge jump from the standard SSD.
 
Apple boasts that the "Mid-2015" systems have "up to 2.5 times faster flash storage than the previous generation" of 15-Inch MacBook Pro models. In independent testing, OWC confirmed these models have read speeds around 2000 MB/s and write speeds around 1200 MB/s. These numbers are in line with Apple's performance claim compared to the SSDs that the company offered with the previous models, but not compared to the maximum speed that the previous systems unofficially can support.
 
Consequently, all of these models can support larger SSDs than the ones provided by default, but some models support faster SSDs, as well.
 
Upgrade Instructions (Mid-2012 & Early 2013 Models)
 
The bottom plate of the 15-Inch Retina Display MacBook Pro is held in place with ten screws of differing lengths, but when the bottom of the notebook is removed, it's simply a matter of disconnecting the battery and removing one more screw to pop out the SSD.

Status:

open

Bewerkt door: mayer ,

Tekst:

Sure it's possible. The problem is obtaining Apple's proprietary SSD. Here's how to do it: [guide|27694]
This is a quote from OWC:
Apple does not intend for end users to upgrade the SSD in these models themselves. The company even has used uncommon "pentalobe" screws -- also called five-point Torx screws -- to make the upgrade more difficult. However, access is straightforward with the correct screwdriver, the SSD modules are removable, and Apple has not blocked upgrades in firmware, either.

As a result, third-parties, like site sponsor OWC have released SSD upgrades with a compatible connector for the "Mid-2012" and "Early 2013" models. Specifically, OWC sells the compatible Mercury Aura Pro SSD and provides the needed screwdriver as well as an Envoy Pro bus-powered external enclosure so the original SSD can be repurposed as an external drive.

OWC is hard at work on compatible SSDs for subsequent models and plans to release ones soon. In testing of the "Mid-2014" systems, OWC discovered that when a "blade" SSD from a Cylinder Mac Pro is installed in one of these systems, it "negotiates a x4 PCIe connection versus the stock cards, which negotiate a x2 PCIe connection." This means that the Retina Display MacBook Pro provided more than 1200 MB/s drive performance, a huge jump from the standard SSD.

Apple boasts that the "Mid-2015" systems have "up to 2.5 times faster flash storage than the previous generation" of 15-Inch MacBook Pro models. In independent testing, OWC confirmed these models have read speeds around 2000 MB/s and write speeds around 1200 MB/s. These numbers are in line with Apple's performance claim compared to the SSDs that the company offered with the previous models, but not compared to the maximum speed that the previous systems unofficially can support.

Consequently, all of these models can support larger SSDs than the ones provided by default, but some models support faster SSDs, as well.

Upgrade Instructions (Mid-2012 & Early 2013 Models)

The bottom plate of the 15-Inch Retina Display MacBook Pro is held in place with ten screws of differing lengths, but when the bottom of the notebook is removed, it's simply a matter of disconnecting the battery and removing one more screw to pop out the SSD.
Sure it's possible. The problem is obtaining Apple's proprietary SSD. Here's how to do it: [guide|27694]
This is a quote from OWC:
Apple does not intend for end users to upgrade the SSD in these models themselves. The company even has used uncommon "pentalobe" screws -- also called five-point Torx screws -- to make the upgrade more difficult. However, access is straightforward with the correct screwdriver, the SSD modules are removable, and Apple has not blocked upgrades in firmware, either.

As a result, third-parties, like site sponsor OWC have released SSD upgrades with a compatible connector for the "Mid-2012" and "Early 2013" models. Specifically, OWC sells the compatible Mercury Aura Pro SSD and provides the needed screwdriver as well as an Envoy Pro bus-powered external enclosure so the original SSD can be repurposed as an external drive.

OWC is hard at work on compatible SSDs for subsequent models and plans to release ones soon. In testing of the "Mid-2014" systems, OWC discovered that when a "blade" SSD from a Cylinder Mac Pro is installed in one of these systems, it "negotiates a x4 PCIe connection versus the stock cards, which negotiate a x2 PCIe connection." This means that the Retina Display MacBook Pro provided more than 1200 MB/s drive performance, a huge jump from the standard SSD.

Apple boasts that the "Mid-2015" systems have "up to 2.5 times faster flash storage than the previous generation" of 15-Inch MacBook Pro models. In independent testing, OWC confirmed these models have read speeds around 2000 MB/s and write speeds around 1200 MB/s. These numbers are in line with Apple's performance claim compared to the SSDs that the company offered with the previous models, but not compared to the maximum speed that the previous systems unofficially can support.

Consequently, all of these models can support larger SSDs than the ones provided by default, but some models support faster SSDs, as well.

Upgrade Instructions (Mid-2012 & Early 2013 Models)

The bottom plate of the 15-Inch Retina Display MacBook Pro is held in place with ten screws of differing lengths, but when the bottom of the notebook is removed, it's simply a matter of disconnecting the battery and removing one more screw to pop out the SSD.

Status:

open

Origineel bericht door: mayer ,

Tekst:

Sure it's possible.  The problem is obtaining Apple's proprietary SSD.  Here's how to do it:  [guide|27694]

Status:

open